MATLAB Answers

Like to know if there are high schools

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Anthony Banks
Anthony Banks on 1 Dec 2017
Commented: Ascension on 13 Sep 2019
Like to know if there are high schools out there using Mathworks and Simulink in STEM and/or Aerospace contexts. I would like my stem classes to get more into simulation in particular rovers and drones. Anyone doing any work in this area? Also, is it too complex for, say, 14 year olds? I was looking at Arduino programming with simulink and the zumo robot but it seemed quite complex.

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Laurent Ebadi
Laurent Ebadi on 31 Jan 2019
Dear Anthony,
For 14 years old students, I would recommend to use Simulink/Stateflow with Microbit and Arduino. If you want to learn the PASS products, please, follow few chapters of the following book: https://www.mathworks.com/academia/courseware/multi-physics-systems.html
Please, wat the video series https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2tUzpII7ww There is the example on the microbit accelerometer, student can study this sensor before controlling the quadcopter model https://www.mathworks.com/help/aeroblks/examples/quadcopter-project.html.
I hope this will help you.
madhan ravi
madhan ravi on 31 Jan 2019
@Laurent by any chance does it cover STM32F3 discovery board?

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Accepted Answer

Greg Drayer
Greg Drayer on 24 Jan 2018
Hi Anthony,
Thanks for your question. I agree with Madhu about recommending the Bytes and Beats course for high school students as a start. This is a good way to introduce young students to algorithms and programming, with a fun music component.
We do have drone and aerospace related educational hardware that could be use to inspire students as well. However, at this time it may take some extra effort to really explain how such systems work to high school students.
Simply put, a drone is a flying embedded system that integrates multiple domains of knowledge. They can be used as an example of how disciplines and technologies converge and how investing time in learning to use multi-domain tools like MATLAB and Simulink can pay off greatly in the future career of students.
To learn more about our educational drone solution for undergraduate and graduate students, please take a look at the following webinar: https://www.mathworks.com/programming-drones-webinar

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More Answers (2)

Madhu Govindarajan
Madhu Govindarajan on 1 Dec 2017
Here is a course that uses Arduino and MATLAB for high school kids - https://www.mathworks.com/academia/highschool/courseware/bytes-and-beats.html

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Steven Lord
Steven Lord on 24 Jan 2018
To add to what Madhu and Greg posted, there are some student competitions listed on our MATLAB for Primary and Secondary Schools page that may interest your students. At a quick glance none of the three robotics-related competitions deal with drones, but the challenges that they task the participants to solve should be enough to capture your students' attention.

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Anthony Banks
Anthony Banks on 31 Jan 2019
Thank you for all these response; I appreciate that you took the time to write back. I'll do some reading through the resources that you suggest.
Ascension
Ascension on 13 Sep 2019
please, read this teacher example from high-school:
In addition, I recommend Simulink/Stateflow because it is intuitive and it brings the right way to develop an algorithm and students can program easily real systems (Arduino/Mambo). By combining models and hardware, students are more engaged to learn.
If you want to learn more about our software, please, use Ivan's book which describes each tool: MATLAB, Simulink, Simscape and Stateflow: https://www.mathworks.com/academia/courseware/multi-physics-systems.html

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