Student Programs

Micromouse Competitions

The Micromouse Competitions is a game in which self-contained robots, made by participants, autonomously explore a maze (by themselves) and compete for the shortest time to reach the goal.

This contest started with the advice of IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) in 1977 and was held annually as "All Japan Micromouse Contest" since 1980. As the first "Robocon" in Japan, the contest is the most historical robot competition in the world.

Currently it is a de facto world tournament, since many other high-tech robots come from other Asian countries, Europe, and the United States.

MathWorks supports this competition by providing tools in any of the following Micromouse leagues.

  • Micromouse Contest
  • Classicmouse Contest
  • Robotrace Contest

Students can take advantage of MATLAB, Simulink, Robotics System Toolbox, and other products to develop algorithms, test them in simulation, and deploy them to hardware.

Complimentary Software

MathWorks provides complimentary software for this competition. If your team is participating in this competition and needs software, fill out the software request form.

The period to request software has closed.

MATLAB and Simulink

Robotics Arena

Learn how to use MATLAB and Simulink to design algorithms, create simulations, and speed up development for student competitions in robotics and unmanned systems.

Video Tutorials for Your Team

Interactive Online Tutorials

Learn by doing! Our two-hour online courses provide a hands-on learning environment where you will interact with a web-based version of MATLAB and receive instant and contextual feedback.

View all tutorials

Simscape Essentials for Automotive Student Teams

Get started with the fundamentals of vehicle development for student competitions, such as Formula Student, using Simscape.

Mobile Robotics Training Videos

Learn to design and test autonomous robot algorithms using MATLAB and Simulink with these free training materials.

Code Generation Video Tutorials

Learn how to convert MATLAB functions and Simulink models to C/C++ code.